src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"> seniors driving | Boomers & Beyond
May 252017
 

(NC) With winter ending and warmer weather approaching, the time is right to think about spring and summer cruising in some great wheels. If you’re in the market for a vehicle this season, there are some things you can do to make the experience interesting, rewarding and satisfying.

By analyzing your driving lifestyle, choosing the vehicle and power that’s right for you and doing your fuel consumption homework, you’ll be driving in style in no time — with money in the bank and a green mindset. Whether you’re looking for a new or used vehicle, check out these tips to get you started:

  1. Analyze your driving needs. Where do you live? What do you do? How will you use your vehicle? How many people and things will you carry along with you? How much will you travel each day? Do you need to tow a boat to your cottage? These are just a few of the questions you can ask yourself to get a realistic idea of the size and type of vehicle you’ll need.

  2. Analyze your choices. Gasoline, diesel, electric or hybrid are your basic power choices nowadays and each has its advantages depending on your driving needs. Do your research to find out which combination of pros and cons works best for you.

  3. Avoid temptation. There are some thirsty, fuel-guzzling vehicles out there and they’re not all pickup trucks or large SUVs. You can find a vehicle with moderate thrills that won’t cost a bundle to fill up or maintain.

  4. Think light, think small, think efficient. Why buy a bigger, more expensive vehicle when a smaller, greener one will do? Help protect the environment for future generations with a more fuel-efficient vehicle that produces fewer greenhouse gases.

  5. Do the math. Check the EnerGuide label on the vehicle for the fuel consumption ratings. For example, a vehicle with a fuel consumption rating of seven litres per 100km would use about half the fuel than a vehicle with a rating of 14 litres per 100km. If you’re looking to purchase a used vehicle, fuel consumption ratings are available on websites such as www.vehicles.nrcan.gc.ca.

www.newscanada.com

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May 192017
 

(BPT) – It can be hard to admit your vision isn’t what it used to be, especially when it comes to driving. Maybe you’ve noticed some difficulties reading traffic signals, or you’ve found it challenging to drive at night.

If you’re a family member noticing these warning signs in a loved one, pointing out these challenges may seem like a daunting and delicate undertaking. But when it comes to being on the road, safety is one thing you can’t ignore.

Encouraging your loved one to prioritize safety can be hard, especially when it feels like their independence is at stake. That’s why it’s important to have an open and honest discussion to determine the best options for maintaining independence outside the home.

Step 1: Address driver safety

Vision is the most important sense for driving safety. Annual vision screening is important for everyone, but it is especially critical for older people, since the sensory data used for driving is predominantly visual.

For seniors still able to drive, a defensive driving class can be beneficial. These classes allow students to brush up on skills while gaining confidence and introduce them to alternative transportation options for the times and locations of their preference. What’s more, many insurance companies provide discounts to seniors who complete these courses.

Giving up driving doesn’t have to mean choosing between all or nothing. For example, start limiting driving to daylight only, non-rush-hour periods. Then look into supplementary transportation options that eliminate the need to drive while still allowing you to get where you need to go.

Step 2: Research transportation options

It’s important to educate yourself or your loved one about locally available transportation options for seniors. When you know there are reliable, cost-effective transportation options available, it can help maintain a high level of independence for a trip to the grocery store or a doctor’s appointment.

Rides in Sight is a nationwide, online database of senior transportation options built by ITNAmerica, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to providing sustainable transportation options for seniors. Visit www.ridesinsight.org and enter basic information like your state or zip code, and you can find the ride option that’s best for your situation. If you prefer to access information by phone, call 1-855-60-RIDES (1-855-607-4337).

Rides in Sight makes it easy to find customized transportation, no matter what a person’s needs. For example, you can find wheelchair accessible transportation options or door-to-door driver assistance if that’s what you need.

Step 3: Implement a trial period

Giving up the keys is easier if you do it over a period of time. Pick a date and schedule your first ride with a transportation service during a time you normally drive. Any change takes time to adapt to, so try it out for a while before reassessing and making any necessary adjustments. After this trial period, you should feel more comfortable with someone else driving you, and you get to be in control of your mobility.

For older Americans, it’s important to be able to maintain independence when they limit or stop driving. When they are encouraged to create their own driving transition plan, more emphasis can be placed on finding new passions and activities to engage with their communities. The result is a positive impact on people of all ages.

To have that impact, reliable, secure transportation is essential. Having the necessary conversations and researching appropriate transportation options helps keep everyone happy, healthy and safe.

May 132017
 

By [http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Lydia_Quinn/29438]Lydia Quinn

As people age, physically we naturally get weaker. Our hearing and eyesight might not be what it once was. Our reflexes are also not as quick as when we were young. We might also have different medical conditions that might affect how well we drive. All of these factors can affect how well seniors drive and their overall safety. However, with the tips below, most seniors can be driving safely for longer than they might think.

Know Your Weaknesses

The first tip is to understand any difficulties you might have and make adjustments for them. For example, if you have poor vision, be sure to keep your eyeglass prescription up to date at all times, and keep an extra pair in your glove compartment, just in case. Also, if you have hearing problems, know how to adjust the levels of your hearing aid. There are many other adjustments you can make to help make driving safer. For example, if you have back trouble, consider getting a pad or cushion to sit on or put behind your back while you drive.

Naturally, older people will have a longer reaction time when they need to brake quickly. Adjust for this by maintaining extra distance between you and the car ahead of you. You can also try to find ways to get to your destination that have less traffic. Less traffic equals easier and less stressful driving for seniors.

Always be aware of what medications you are taking. A surprising amount of common prescriptions have side effects that may affect your driving ability. Things like dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, seizures and eye problems can all happen due to medications. Blood pressure and heart medications are commonly taken by seniors, and their possible side effects include all of these. If you have certain eye problems, special glasses might help you see better when driving. Be sure to ask your eye doctor about that.

Brush Up On Driving Basics

If you’re worried about driving as you get older, it may be wise to take a driving class to brush up on the basics. In fact, there are classes available tailored to senior drivers.

When To Stop Driving

For most of us, there will come a time when driving will simply be too difficult or unsafe due to our age. Don’t be afraid to give up your vehicle though, these days, it doesn’t mean giving up your freedom. There are many senior shuttle services available. You can also take advantage of public transportation like buses and trains. Buses usually have a special senior discount. There’s also ride sharing services that make it easier to get a ride now than ever before. In the next decade though, the amazing invention of self-driving cars may just eliminate the need for any of us to drive, including seniors.

Visit BrandonSafetyLights for the best in traffic safety supplies: http://brandonsafetylights.com

Article Source: [http://EzineArticles.com/?Senior-Driver-Traffic-Safety-Tips&id=9694332] Senior Driver Traffic Safety Tips

May 122017
 

(BPT) – It can be hard to admit your vision isn’t what it used to be, especially when it comes to driving. Maybe you’ve noticed some difficulties reading traffic signals, or you’ve found it challenging to drive at night.

If you’re a family member noticing these warning signs in a loved one, pointing out these challenges may seem like a daunting and delicate undertaking. But when it comes to being on the road, safety is one thing you can’t ignore.

Encouraging your loved one to prioritize safety can be hard, especially when it feels like their independence is at stake. That’s why it’s important to have an open and honest discussion to determine the best options for maintaining independence outside the home.

Step 1: Address driver safety

Vision is the most important sense for driving safety. Annual vision screening is important for everyone, but it is especially critical for older people, since the sensory data used for driving is predominantly visual.

For seniors still able to drive, a defensive driving class can be beneficial. These classes allow students to brush up on skills while gaining confidence and introduce them to alternative transportation options for the times and locations of their preference. What’s more, many insurance companies provide discounts to seniors who complete these courses.

Giving up driving doesn’t have to mean choosing between all or nothing. For example, start limiting driving to daylight only, non-rush-hour periods. Then look into supplementary transportation options that eliminate the need to drive while still allowing you to get where you need to go.

Step 2: Research transportation options

It’s important to educate yourself or your loved one about locally available transportation options for seniors. When you know there are reliable, cost-effective transportation options available, it can help maintain a high level of independence for a trip to the grocery store or a doctor’s appointment.

Rides in Sight is a nationwide, online database of senior transportation options built by ITNAmerica, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to providing sustainable transportation options for seniors. Visit www.ridesinsight.org and enter basic information like your state or zip code, and you can find the ride option that’s best for your situation. If you prefer to access information by phone, call 1-855-60-RIDES (1-855-607-4337).

Rides in Sight makes it easy to find customized transportation, no matter what a person’s needs. For example, you can find wheelchair accessible transportation options or door-to-door driver assistance if that’s what you need.

Step 3: Implement a trial period

Giving up the keys is easier if you do it over a period of time. Pick a date and schedule your first ride with a transportation service during a time you normally drive. Any change takes time to adapt to, so try it out for a while before reassessing and making any necessary adjustments. After this trial period, you should feel more comfortable with someone else driving you, and you get to be in control of your mobility.

For older Americans, it’s important to be able to maintain independence when they limit or stop driving. When they are encouraged to create their own driving transition plan, more emphasis can be placed on finding new passions and activities to engage with their communities. The result is a positive impact on people of all ages.

To have that impact, reliable, secure transportation is essential. Having the necessary conversations and researching appropriate transportation options helps keep everyone happy, healthy and safe.

Dec 282016
 

(NC) Whether it’s two feet of snow on the driveway or slush that turns a parking lot into a hockey rink, Canadians face some unpredictable harsh winter driving conditions. Here are five tips to help ease your mind and stay safe while on the roads this winter.

  1. Get winter tires fitted. In addition to superior handling and braking, winter tires provide better traction than all-season ones, helping to shorten braking distance by as much as 25 per cent. You can put them on your vehicle when temperatures dip below 7°C. Remember that air pressure decreases in colder weather, so don’t forget to check tire pressure at least once a month during the season.

  2. Stay alert (and in control). Everyday operating becomes much more difficult in wintery conditions such as snow, sleet, and ice. When out on the road be sure to give yourself plenty of room and time to turn or stop on a dime.

  3. Handle skidding like a pro. Chances are you’ll encounter conditions that cause your vehicle to skid at some point this season. Though this may sound counter-intuitive, you should turn into the skid and accelerate. This shifts the weight of your car from the front to the rear, helping you to safely regain control.

  4. Don’t be afraid to leave your car outside. Today’s vehicles undergo more rigorous testing using realistic weather conditions than ever before. For example, General Motors puts its vehicles through extensive cold weather testing. “We know customers can leave cars parked in extreme cold for several days at a time,” explains Chris Jones, General Motors of Canada cold weather development centre supervisor. “Our 36-hour ‘soak’ mimics these conditions of prolonged inactivity and can identify any issues before a vehicle hits the market.” This should give you peace of mind when away for a long weekend.

  5. Create a driving ‘survival kit.’ Compile a kit full of safety and emergency winter equipment and leave it in the trunk at all times. Include items like water bottles and non-perishable foods as well as a first aid kit, flashlight, map, gloves, blanket, booster cables, windshield wiper fluid, and candles.

www.newscanada.com

Oct 152016
 

(NC) You may not be able to do anything about the price of gas, but you can still save yourself a bundle if you’re smart. Affordable driving can be as easy as avoiding these five gas-wasting habits everyone falls prey to sometimes.c40a8cb15de1451a8b7d718e38a0f7dc

  1. The red light trap. Nobody likes getting stuck at a red, and it’s so tempting to floor the gas and get back underway. But aggressive acceleration pushes your engine harder than normal driving and sucks back gulps of gas with each burst of speed. Take it easy when the light turns green — your engine and wallet will both thank you. Don’t worry about racing the guy next to you to the next red light, just relax.

  2. Over-driving. It feels intuitive to constantly monitor and adjust your speed to gain any advantage on the road. But even small constant speed changes can skyrocket your gas use. Pick a speed that works for the situation, sit back, stay at that speed and use your extra focus to keep an eye on traffic ahead to avoid unnecessary stopping.

  3. The bumper-to-bumper pitfall. Not only does getting caught up in the middle of traffic feel awful, it wreaks havoc on your mileage, too. All that starting, stopping, speed changing, and sudden braking to avoid that guy on his phone you just noticed — it’s sucking money right out of your wallet. You can save yourself cash and aggravation by keeping your eyes far up ahead to get an early heads-up on any situations you may have to deal with.

  4. NASCAR driving. The faster you go, the more gas you need to keep up those high speeds. Going from 100 km/h to 120 km/h drinks up about 20 percent more gas. Allow for a few more minutes of smart driving in your trip and arrive happier and richer.

  5. The braking trap. We’re hardwired as drivers to follow a simple equation: gas equals go, brake equals stop. But we can fool ourselves into also thinking brake equals slow. It’s far easier and cheaper to just coast when you want to slow down. Give yourself a little time to cool off your speed when you see the next light turn red. The slower you’re going when you need to apply the brakes, the less force they need to stop you safely. Not only will this save you gas, but your brake pads will thank you, not to mention your passengers.

Find more information online at vehicles.gc.ca.

www.newscanada.com

Sep 202016
 

(NC) With winter around the corner, drivers should know how their vehicle will handle in various situations so that they can be prepared for poor weather conditions.22768829

“While modern anti-lock braking system, electronic traction, and stability control technologies all provide added grip and handling regardless of the drive wheels, the driving dynamics of each vehicle are unique,” says Jacob Black, senior editor at autoTRADER.ca. He explains the pros and cons of each type in easy-to-follow language:

Front-wheel drive. FWD is the most common configuration in modern passenger vehicles. They’re less expensive to produce and offer a more efficient use of space since there’s no driveline routed through the cabin. With the engine usually located in the front of the vehicle, this setup also offers good traction from a standstill in snow and slush.

Rear-wheel drive. RWD is most often found on pickups and performance-focused sports cars or sedans. Pickups benefit from it when carrying a heavy load in the bed or towing. RWD in a performance car allows for more ideal handling dynamics and balanced weight distribution. But it can also provide less traction in slippery conditions and tends to oversteer when applying power during cornering, which some find unpredictable and unnerving.

All-wheel drive. Just as the name states, AWD systems are capable of delivering power to all four wheels, many of which are now able to divert additional traction from front-to-back or side-to-side, depending on conditions. Offering well-balanced driving dynamics and traction over a variety of road conditions, AWD also tends to suffer from higher fuel consumption due to the added weight and components.

The verdict. While all-wheel drive generally offers the best grip, it has a few shortcomings and can create a false sense of security. While there are theories about the optimal drive, a lot depends on the vehicle and its intended application. In many cases, having good tires is more important than which wheels the power is coming from. Remember that no matter what you choose, in the end it’s less about what you drive than how you drive.

Find more information at www.autoTRADER.ca.

www.newscanada.com

Jul 222016
 

(NC) There’s a saying in Canada that we only have two seasons: winter and construction. As

Canadian roadworks signs.

Canadian roadworks signs.

Ontarians hit the road this summer we need to remember that road construction is a temporary but necessary inconvenience and that road safety is every driver’s responsibility. This is especially true in construction zones.

Collision data from the Ministry of Transportation shows an increasing number of collisions and fatalities in construction zones. Across the province, there were 1,519 collisions in construction zones in 2011, followed by 1,592 in 2012 and 1,694 in 2013. These collisions led to three, four and eight fatalities, respectively.

It’s every driver’s responsibility to help prevent these tragic statistics by doing everything they can to ensure construction workers’ safety. Follow these tips to keep road workers, your passengers and yourself safe this summer.

  1. Plan ahead to avoid delays. Know where construction zones and other delays are beforehand so they’re not unexpected. Ontario511 is an excellent resource, as are traffic apps and radio stations that update information constantly. If possible, find an alternate route to avoid construction zones and other delays altogether.

  2. Adhere to posted speed limits and other signage on the road. Speed limits change in construction zones for a reason. Make sure you follow posted signage and exercise caution in construction zones.

  3. Avoid driving distractions. Plan your route before departing and only use your cell phone when parked. Make sure to pre-set your climate control, mirrors, GPS and radio stations in advance.

  4. Treat construction zones as if they were your own workplace. Show respect for construction workers by treating these zones as if they were your own workplace. Treat construction workers the way you’d like to be treated when you’re at work.

  5. Stay off the majors. Construction and traffic can be more prevalent on major routes throughout the summer. Stay off the highly travelled and popular roads and take advantage of Ontario’s countryside to avoid delays and enjoy the scenic route.

Find more tips for staying cool and safe on our roads this summer at www.orba.org or #SiteUnseen.

Attention editors: This article is for distribution in Ontario only.

www.newscanada.com

Mar 262016
 

(BPT) – New technologies are responsible for many of the advances, comforts and conveniences of modern life, from the smartphone to wearable items such as “smart” wristwatches and eyeglasses. That’s no different in the car, where new technology is helping people drive more safely.

22768829While cars today may not look much different from previous model years, the latest technology is helping save lives. One in five injury crashes could be prevented or reduced if all passenger vehicles were equipped with specific types of technology, according to a study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Enhancing vehicle safety

In the past, safety features were geared toward protecting drivers and passengers during a crash. Now, newer vehicle technologies have the potential to prevent a collision altogether. Many are already on the market, including:

* Blind-spot warning systems warn drivers of objects in blind spots, especially while changing lanes and parking.

* Back-up cameras warn of objects behind the vehicle to help drivers judge distances and reverse more safely.

* Smart headlights adjust the range and intensity of light based on the distance of traffic and to reduce glare and improve night vision.

* Collision avoidance systems alert the driver when the vehicle may be in danger of a collision.

* Lane departure warnings monitor the vehicle’s position and warn the driver if the vehicle deviates outside the lane.

* Parking assistance indicates distance to objects, making parking easier, or may enable vehicles to park on their own.

* Adaptive cruise control allows the car to adjust its speed depending on traffic conditions.

“As these technologies become more widely available in new cars today, it’s important all drivers learn how they work and how to use them effectively,” says Jodi Olshevski, gerontologist and executive director of The Hartford Center for Mature Market Excellence. “This is especially true for mature drivers, as many technologies can enhance the driving experience as we age.”

Top technologies among mature drivers

Drivers ages 50 to 69, according to a new study from The Hartford and the MIT AgeLab, are most willing to adopt the following vehicle technologies: 1) blind-spot warning systems, 2) back-up cameras, 3) smart headlights, 4) collision avoidance systems, and 5) lane departure warnings.

A majority of participants indicated they are willing to purchase these five technologies, are likely to use them, and think they are worth having.

These technologies can help keep drivers safe and feeling confident behind the wheel. For example, back-up cameras can help drivers with reduced flexibility to see behind the vehicle, and blind-spot warning systems may help drivers with limited range of motion be more comfortable while driving.

The importance of learning about vehicle technology

Learning more about how vehicle technologies work is a smart step to keeping drivers safer on the road. Many new cars already include some safety technologies, and all new cars will be required to have back-up cameras by May 2018.

Staying current on the latest features available — and using them appropriately — may help all drivers, including mature drivers, stay safe behind the wheel. To learn more, drivers can download a free vehicle technology guidebook and take an interactive video quiz at thehartford.com/cartech.

 

 

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